Skip to content

What Is A Calorie Deficit Diet: Benefits, How To & Does it Work?

What Is A Calorie Deficit Diet: Benefits, How To & Does it Work?  The energy deficit diet, also known as a calorie deficit diet, is a scientifically backed dietary approach...

What Is A Calorie Deficit Diet: Benefits, How To & Does it Work? 


The energy deficit diet, also known as a calorie deficit diet, is a scientifically backed dietary approach that involves consuming fewer calories than your body requires to maintain its current weight. The fundamental principle behind this diet is to create a calorie deficit, which forces your body to tap into its stored fat reserves for energy, thereby leading to weight loss over time.


While the concept may seem straightforward, it is crucial to understand the potential benefits and drawbacks of this approach. On the positive side, an energy deficit diet can facilitate weight and fat loss, ultimately improving various health markers such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar control. Additionally, this dietary regimen offers flexibility, allowing individuals to incorporate their favourite foods into their diet, provided they maintain a calorie deficit.


However, it is equally important to recognise the potential drawbacks of an overly simplistic approach. If the diet is not properly planned, it can lead to nutrient deficiencies, particularly if an excessively large calorie deficit is pursued to accelerate weight loss. Such a drastic deficit can result in hunger, cravings, and reduced energy levels due to low blood sugar. Moreover, over time, the body may adapt to the calorie deficit by lowering its metabolic rate, making further weight loss increasingly challenging.


To mitigate these potential drawbacks, it is imperative to focus on nutrient-dense, whole foods that provide essential vitamins, minerals, and fibre to support overall health while in a calorie deficit. Adjusting macronutrient levels is also recommended:


Protein: Ensuring adequate protein intake is crucial to preserve lean muscle mass and support metabolism. A general guideline is to consume 1.2-2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. For example, a 65-kilogram woman should aim for a protein intake of 78-130 grams.


Carbohydrates: Adjusting carbohydrate intake based on activity level and personal preferences is advisable. For weight loss, many individuals find success with a moderate to low-carb approach, especially when reducing carbohydrates from processed sources and emphasising fibre-rich whole foods. An intake of less than 100 grams of carbohydrates per day is considered low carb.


Fats: It is essential not to undereat fats, as they provide essential fatty acids and promote satiety. Aim for sources such as avocados, nuts, seeds, and fatty fish.


Calorie deficit: Creating a moderate calorie deficit of approximately 300-500 calories below your maintenance level is recommended. This approach promotes weight loss while minimising potential side effects like muscle loss or a slowed metabolism. It is estimated that men require a calorie intake of 2,100-2,600 calories daily, while women require 1,600-2,100 calories, depending on age and activity level. Thus, energy deficit diets would typically range from 1,800-2,000 calories for a moderately active man and 1,400-1,600 calories for a woman.


It is crucial to adjust macronutrients as needed, monitor progress, and make further adjustments if weight loss stalls. If weight loss plateaus, it may be necessary to further decrease calorie intake or increase activity level.


It is also essential to consider the impact of alcohol consumption on an energy deficit diet and weight loss efforts. Alcohol is relatively high in calories and provides no nutritional value. A single gram of alcohol contains 7 calories, which is almost as much as a gram of fat (9 calories). Alcoholic beverages like beer, wine, and mixed drinks can quickly add a significant number of calories to your daily intake, potentially hindering your calorie deficit. Furthermore, alcohol is processed differently from other macronutrients; it is prioritised by the body for metabolism, meaning it is burned before fat. Consequently, even if alcohol calories are budgeted for, you may not see the desired results on the scale.


In conclusion, carefully devised and well-managed energy deficit diets can be beneficial tools in achieving sustainable weight loss when combined with regular exercise. However, it is essential to prioritise long-term lifestyle changes over short-term, restrictive diets for lasting results.



Tracey Randell

Registered Nutritionist, Dip BCNH, IFMCP, M BANT, CNHC

https://ibsclinics.co.uk 

Related Products.

You might also like.

What Is A Calorie Deficit Diet: Benefits, How To & Does it Work?

LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS LATEST NEWS

12 May 2024

What Is A Calorie Deficit Diet: Benefits, How To & Does it Work?

What Is A Calorie Deficit Diet: Benefits, How To & Does it Work?  The energy deficit diet, also known as a calorie deficit diet, is a scientifically backed dietary...

READ MORE
Top Wellbeing Tips From Wholistic Wellness Expert Naomi Buff
04 May 2024

Top Wellbeing Tips From Wholistic Wellness Expert Naomi Buff

Make peace with your plate for a happy healthy mind!    Have you heard the phrase, “you are what you eat?”    In simple terms, if we eat high...

READ MORE
10 YEARS FROM THE TUB TO THE TOP (Well almost)
29 April 2024

10 YEARS FROM THE TUB TO THE TOP (Well almost)

Well it's been almost 10 years to the day since we sold our first juice out of an old cast iron bathtub in Old street station. I can’t tell...

READ MORE

Cart

Your cart is currently empty.

30

Plant Diversity Tracker

Select options